Wednesday, 12 February 2020

Frampton RSPB Reserve.


Despite still being windy following Storm Ciara, Wednesday 12th was forecast to be bright and sunny.  With this in mind I was up early, breakfasted and with pack-up made I was soon on my way to Frampton RSPB reserve just south of Boston on the edge of The Wash and the mouths of the Rivers Witham and Welland.  Behind the sea bank, the reserve is an area of shallow scrapes, marsh and reed beds.  It is good for many breeding birds as well as prime overwintering for thousands of wigeon and brent geese among others.  There are large flocks of waders, especially godwit, lapwing and golden plover.  It is also an ideal spot during spring and summer migration.

I was soon settled in the large 360 degree hide with good views over two large scrapes.  Brent geese were much in evidence along with flocks of lapwing and golden plover.  Closer to the hide were a few ruff still in winter plumage along with lapwing and black tailed godwit.  Wigeon were busily feeding along the grass banks of the scrapes.  Ecery so often thousands of birds would fly up and wheel in the air in panic as  a raptor flew through.

After a sandwich I walked around to the East Hide which was closer to the brent geese which spent a lot of time flying between the reserve and the Wash saltmarsh.  As well as the large numbers of geese were wigeon, teal and shoveler.  On the way to the hide I was rewarded with excellent views and photo opportunity of a stonechat.

I have never had a bad day at Frampton and today was no exception.
Black Tailed Godwit

Black Tailed Godwit

Brent Geese

Brent Geese

Brent Geese

Lapwing

Lapwing

Lapwing

Little Egret

Redshank

Ruff

Ruff

Ruff

Ruff

Shelduck

Shoeveler

Stonechat

Teal

Wigeon

Wigeon

Wigeon

Wigeon

Friday, 7 February 2020

A Yorkshire Day Out

Not having been to see the snowdrops at Burton Agnes for a few years a visit was overdue.  On arrival it was time for coffee and cake before investigation the snowdrop walk.  As usual there were swathes of plants all in the peak of condition.  It was a joy to walk amongst them  and I enjoyed photographing both wide views and closeups.














After a cup of tea we decided to continue on to Bempton Cliffs RSPB reserve.  I was not expecting many birds but felt that a walk along the cliffs would be invigorating nonetheless.  How wrong I was!  The cliffs were a hive of activity. Plenty of gannets were cruising along the edge of the cliffs and out at sea and substantial numbers were settled on the vertiginous cliffs along with hundreds of guillemots that had already returned from their winter sojourn at sea.  There were a few razorbills and puffins have yet to return.  Kittiwakes were present in good numbers and fulmars were plentiful performing their usual trick of flying out from the cliff and quickly back again, making them challenging to photograph.
It was cold on the cliff top so we headed over to Flamborough thinking of our evening meal.  As we were rather early for our booking we drove to North Landing for a while before enjoying an excellent meal at The Seabirds Bar and Restaurant.